It’s Our Job To Prove The Power Of Newspapers

Newspaper readership is a positive story.

At least two state associations are telling it this year with impressive new results that are encouraging — especially during a deadly pandemic.

Others are in the wings.

In Florida, Jim Fogler, president and CEO of the state’s press association, this month released a survey that confirmed registered voters are turning to newspapers for reliable, accurate news.

In Tennessee, Carol Daniels, executive director of the state’s press association, used her monthly newspaper to cheer the initial results of a commissioned survey that documents vibrant readership among Tennessee newspapers.

Here’s the critical back story:

Research conducted by experts costs money. But if you consider it an investment, rather than a new expense, the financial return can be achieved from the additional ad sales you helped secure by arming newspaper sales staffs with head-turning data and from the new subscribers you attracted by promoting the vital value of newspapers.

These days, testimonials that newspapers are crucial contributors to an informed society are priceless. There are new generations, with no newspapers mentors, to attract as well.

We cannot tire of repelling the flood of “media bad” reports that seem to pop up each week and pollute perceptions that harm newspapers.

And then there’s this major Relevant Point:

All of our catchy and poetic slogans need supporting data to be even more effective
.
Florida’s news release pinned newspaper opportunity during a pandemic on the traditional trusted source of reliable information embracing the “craving” for “accuracy amid a barrage of COVID-19 misinformation.”
Right on.

The survey found that four in five Floridians say they get “some” or “a lot” of their coronavirus information from newspapers or their online editions.

Florida Press also reported that more than 5 out of 10 voters (53 percent) said they obtain COVID-19 information from newspapers’ online editions, with another one-quarter indicating they get their pandemic news from a combination of newspapers’ web and print editions. “Even in a fiscally challenging era for the newspaper industry, this reliance reflects how newspapers remain a trusted staple of American society, dating back to before the nation was founded,” the association said.

Leave it to Florida to add the timely thunder for our industry.

“These findings reinforce what we have long suspected: When confusion spreads, people know they can turn to newspapers for dependable, accurate information that cuts through the noise,” Fogler stated. ” Newspapers provide the most in-depth and thoughtful coverage on important issues of the day, and right now the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates anew the relevance and resonance of local newspapers.”

The survey, conducted Aug. 20-22 by Sachs Media’s Breakthrough Research division, asked 1,000 registered Florida voters about their information sources on COVID-19. Key findings of the survey, with a 3.3% margin of error, include (I’m quoting directly from the association’s news release):

Four out of five Floridians (80 percent) said they get “some” or “a lot” of COVID-19 news content through newspapers – 53 percent from newspaper websites, 24 percent from a combination of print newspapers and their online sites, and 3 percent from print editions only. Just 20 percent of respondents chose neither print nor online newspapers as their information source.
Responses to this question were largely consistent across party, gender, and age groups, with the exception that 65 percent of younger voters ages 18 to 34 engage only with newspapers’ online material and none in that group exclusively read print editions for COVID-19 news.

In Tennessee, Daniels updated her membership with a “From the Executive Director” column in the association’s August newspaper that carried this headline: “Early survey returns show positive readership numbers.”

“Readers said newspapers were more trustworthy than all other providers of news and information,” Daniels wrote. “No ‘fake news’ from you!”

The research was completed by Coda Ventures, which is also a supporting partner of The Relevance Project.
In the September edition, the association noted “the power of Tennessee Newspapers” with facts from the Coda market study:

*Every month, 82 percent of Tennessee adults read a newspaper. “We know newspaper advertising is effective, and we know that our newspapers are read by a lot of Tennesseans,” Daniels added.
*Newspapers reach 84 percent of voters in Tennessee. That begs this question: Why would political campaigns not buy ads in newspapers?
*89 percent of Tennesseans who are shopping or intending to buy a new vehicle in Tennessee read newspapers. Beep, beep.
*72 percent of adults in Tennessee reader public notices in newspaper and 84 percent feel newspapers are the most trusted source for public notices. I’m sure this will frame a special message to the state legislature.
*And, 96 percent of Tennesseans who are considering increasing their education with an educational institution read newspapers. (Note: There an excellent “Call to Action” regarding educational services on The Relevance Project Revenue Resource 2020 web site. See it here.)

The Tennessee Press Association plans to collaborate with its members to “strategize with your teams on the best ways to present the information to your current advertisers and potential single-issue buyers and subscribers,” Daniels wrote.

She ended her August column on this high note:

“You have to love it what you know turns out to be so true.”


Relevant Request:
If your association has new research regarding the power of newspapers, please share it. We’ll update this report. (My sources say at least two more associations are engaged in readership studies.)

Collecting this data from the associations and presenting it in one spot is VERY Relevant.

Thanks.
-TAS

Newspaper readership is a positive story.

At least two state associations are telling it this year with impressive new results that are encouraging — especially during a deadly pandemic.

Others are in the wings.

In Florida, Jim Fogler, president and CEO of the state’s press association, this month released a survey that confirmed registered voters are turning to newspapers for reliable, accurate news.

In Tennessee, Carol Daniels, executive director of the state’s press association, used her monthly newspaper to cheer the initial results of a commissioned survey that documents vibrant readership among Tennessee newspapers.

Here’s the critical back story:

Research conducted by experts costs money. But if you consider it an investment, rather than a new expense, the financial return can be achieved from the additional ad sales you helped secure by arming newspaper sales staffs with head-turning data and from the new subscribers you attracted by promoting the vital value of newspapers.

These days, testimonials that newspapers are crucial contributors to an informed society are priceless. There are new generations, with no newspapers mentors, to attract as well.

We cannot tire of repelling the flood of “media bad” reports that seem to pop up each week and pollute perceptions that harm newspapers.

And then there’s this major Relevant Point:

All of our catchy and poetic slogans need supporting data to be even more effective
.
Florida’s news release pinned newspaper opportunity during a pandemic on the traditional trusted source of reliable information embracing the “craving” for “accuracy amid a barrage of COVID-19 misinformation.”
Right on.

The survey found that four in five Floridians say they get “some” or “a lot” of their coronavirus information from newspapers or their online editions.

Florida Press also reported that more than 5 out of 10 voters (53 percent) said they obtain COVID-19 information from newspapers’ online editions, with another one-quarter indicating they get their pandemic news from a combination of newspapers’ web and print editions. “Even in a fiscally challenging era for the newspaper industry, this reliance reflects how newspapers remain a trusted staple of American society, dating back to before the nation was founded,” the association said.

Leave it to Florida to add the timely thunder for our industry.

“These findings reinforce what we have long suspected: When confusion spreads, people know they can turn to newspapers for dependable, accurate information that cuts through the noise,” Fogler stated. ” Newspapers provide the most in-depth and thoughtful coverage on important issues of the day, and right now the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates anew the relevance and resonance of local newspapers.”

The survey, conducted Aug. 20-22 by Sachs Media’s Breakthrough Research division, asked 1,000 registered Florida voters about their information sources on COVID-19. Key findings of the survey, with a 3.3% margin of error, include (I’m quoting directly from the association’s news release):

  • Four out of five Floridians (80 percent) said they get “some” or “a lot” of COVID-19 news content through newspapers – 53 percent from newspaper websites, 24 percent from a combination of print newspapers and their online sites, and 3 percent from print editions only. Just 20 percent of respondents chose neither print nor online newspapers as their information source.
  • Responses to this question were largely consistent across party, gender, and age groups, with the exception that 65 percent of younger voters ages 18 to 34 engage only with newspapers’ online material and none in that group exclusively read print editions for COVID-19 news.

In Tennessee, Daniels updated her membership with a “From the Executive Director” column in the association’s August newspaper that carried this headline: “Early survey returns show positive readership numbers.”

“Readers said newspapers were more trustworthy than all other providers of news and information,” Daniels wrote. “No ‘fake news’ from you!”

The research was completed by Coda Ventures, which is also a supporting partner of The Relevance Project.

In the September edition, the association noted “the power of Tennessee Newspapers” with facts from the Coda market study:

  • Every month, 82 percent of Tennessee adults read a newspaper. “We know newspaper advertising is effective, and we know that our newspapers are read by a lot of Tennesseans,” Daniels added.
  • Newspapers reach 84 percent of voters in Tennessee. That begs this question: Why would political campaigns not buy ads in newspapers?
  • 89 percent of Tennesseans who are shopping or intending to buy a new vehicle in Tennessee read newspapers. Beep, beep.
  • 72 percent of adults in Tennessee reader public notices in newspaper and 84 percent feel newspapers are the most trusted source for public notices. I’m sure this will frame a special message to the state legislature.
  • And, 96 percent of Tennesseans who are considering increasing their education with an educational institution read newspapers. (Note: There an excellent “Call to Action” regarding educational services on The Relevance Project Revenue Resource 2020 web site. See it here.)

The Tennessee Press Association plans to collaborate with its members to “strategize with your teams on the best ways to present the information to your current advertisers and potential single-issue buyers and subscribers,” Daniels wrote.

She ended her August column on this high note:

“You have to love it what you know turns out to be so true.”

Relevant Request:
If your association has new research regarding the power of newspapers, please share it. We’ll update this report. (My sources say at least two more associations are engaged in readership studies.)

Collecting this data from the associations and presenting it in one spot is VERY Relevant.

Thanks.

–TAS

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